To Kill a Mockingbird

In a well structured, four-paragraph blog essay, write on ONE of the following topics and discuss thoroughly using specific examples and details from the novel. A minimum of two quotations, properly cited, and at least 350-400 words is required. See coxteach.wordpress.com. (NOTE: Any outside references to any other sources will result in an automatic failing grade.)

  1. Discuss Atticus’ parenting style. What is his relationship to his children like? How does he seek to instill conscience in them?

OR

  1. “‘ You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view'” (Lee 30). Discuss this quotation as it pertains to the novel.
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~ by Ms. Cox on April 15, 2015.

28 Responses to “To Kill a Mockingbird”

  1. To Kill a Mockingbird
    In “To Kill a Mockingbird”, the father, Atticus, has a unique parenting style that revolves around him being a lawyer and a single father. It seems that Atticus uses his knowledge as a lawyer to keep his children in line and to children it seems that he is just being really strict. His relationship to his children is how he treats them with respect and views them as his equals and he teaches them what he thinks is important for them to know. When Atticus seeks to instill conscience in them to do something or not do something, he goes into want Scout calls his, court room voice, and makes a ‘deal’ with them.
    Atticus’ relationship with his children is how he treats them with respect and views them as his equals and he teaches then what he thinks is important for them to know. “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.”(Lee 149). This quotation is from when Mrs. Dubose died and is one of the lessons that Atticus instilled in Jem and it may not be a normal lesson that parents nowadays teach their children, but to Atticus it must have been important. This shows how he does not try to hide anything from his children and teaches them what is important to make a good person.
    Atticus seeks to instill conscience in them to do something or not do something, he goes into want Scout(Jean Louise Finch), calls his court room voice, and makes a ‘deal’ with them. “If you’ll concede the necessity of going to school, we’ll go on reading every night just as we always have. Is it a bargain?”(Lee 41). This quotation shows how Atticus would make a deal with his children to make them do something, such as in this case as going to school, and he would do something for them in return. In doing this he not only instilled some conscience in them but also he treats them as equals in the world.
    The ‘so what’ of this is that Atticus has a unique parenting style that revolves around him being a lawyer and a single father. Any child lucky enough to have an Atticus like father should value all the lessons that that person teaches. He uses his knowledge as a lawyer to keep his children in line however his children just think he’s just being strict. His relationship to his children is how he treats them with respect and views them as his equals and he teaches them what he thinks is important for them to know. When Atticus seeks to instill conscience in them to do something or not do something, he goes into want Scout calls his, court room voice, and makes a ‘deal’ with them.
    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.
    By: Nicholas Saweczko

  2. Atticus Finch is, by no means, the stereotypical Alabama citizen from the 1930’s. Well educated, unbiased, single father. Atticus seems very out of place when compared to characters like the Cunninghams, Bob Ewell, or Boo Radley. Like other aspects of his character description, Atticus is not like a traditional father, for many reasons. Now, some may claim that his parenting techniques are not what a child needs in order to grow. However, it is also a fair declaration that how Atticus raises Scout and Jem is perfectly fine and is, in some cases, better than the traditional way of child rearing.

    Scout and Jem very obviously love their father, each in their own ways.
    Jem wants Atticus’s respect and love, and is by his father’s side even if Atticus does not want Jem to be there. Scout, who lives by her heart more than her head, fights for Atticus’s honor against kids at school, kids whose parents think little of Atticus for defending a black man. Scout fights until he tells her to “… just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what anybody says to you, don’t you let ’em get your goat. Try fightin’ with your head for a change.” (Lee, 41) Atticus gets a great deal of respect from his children, which he gives back equally. Atticus sees his children as equals to him, and treats them as such. He not only trusts them, but he also does not restrict them from hard truths, such as how some people will feel contempt towards another person based on the color of their skin. Atticus understands that his children are humans and treats them in a similar way to grown ups.

    Atticus is a man with a conscience. He respects everyone, regardless of social standing and color of the skin, as long as they are a good man. In his own words, “I do my best to love everybody…it’s never an insult to be called what somebody thinks is a bad name. It just shows you how poor that person is, it doesn’t hurt you.” (Lee, 101) He sees people as basically good with bad tendencies, and he teaches this outlook to his children as much as he can. Scout was born hotheaded and big-hearted, but Atticus teaches her to have respect and patience by “climb into his skin and walk around in it.” (Lee, 39). By the end of the book, Scout has learned to accept people as much as she can. Atticus is a man with a heart and will use it as much as he can.

    Atticus may not be a father that follows society’s rules for parenting. However, that does not mean he is any less of a father than someone who abides by the average family raising methods. Jem and Scout not only look up to him as a respected father figure, but he also sees them as intelligent and wonderful children he has raised. Atticus holds himself above the racist norm of Maycomb, while simultaneously holding most people at the same respect as he holds himself. Atticus is not only a successful character in To Kill A Mockingbird, he is also a character who would succeed in real life. Atticus Finch. Father. Lawyer. Gentleman.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.
    By: Dylan Quaint

  3. The quotation from Harper Lee’s, To Kill a Mockingbird, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39), relates to the novel in many situations. It is meaning that you can not judge what a person does until you see things the way they see things. This quotation pertains to the book in Mayella Ewell and Boo Radley’s case.

    This quotation relates to Mayella Ewell because she is being looked at as the bad person by the coloured people during the Tom Robinson case, when she is also a victim. Mayella’s father, Bob Ewell rapes Mayella, which is disclosed during the trial when Tom says, “She said she’s never kissed a grown man before an’ she might as well kiss a n****r. She says what her papa do to her don’t count” (Lee, 260). Mayella tempted Tom, which Bob does not like because he is racist, like most of the town, and frowns upon white and coloured people being together. Bob punishes Mayella for tempting Tom by beating her, which is proven because she was beaten about the left side of her body and Bob is left handed, whereas Tom has no use of his left arm. Bob needed Tom out of Mayella’s life so he decided jail would be the best option, knowing no coloured man would ever win in court. Being in Mayella’s shoes, one can infer that Bob put her up to accusing Tom so she would not be tempted by him anymore and she agreed with her father because she knows she will be beaten if she does not.

    This quotation also applies to Boo Radley.The people of Maycomb made up the story that Boo never leaves his house because he went crazy, stabbed his father and was locked up. Throughout the book it is made clear that he is not the person everyone makes him out to be. No one understands why he would stay inside, so feel they have to make an excuse for it. Scout realizes that Boo is not the person he is perceived to be the night Maudie’s house burns down because when she realizes she has a blanket wrapped around her, she asks Atticus who put it there, “Boo Radley. You were so busy looking at the fire you didn’t know it when he put the blanket around you” (Lee, 96). In the end of Chapter 23, Jem says, “I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time…It’s because he wants to stay inside” (Lee, 304). Jem is one of the few people that understands the reason Boo does not leave the house, which is because he does not want to. Jem takes the quotation Atticus said to heart and applied it to Boo’s situation at that moment.

    “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39), is a very important quotation in this book, especially with it being one of the many themes. Atticus opened up Jem and Scout to seeing things in another way, opposed to the towns and their own way, in Boo’s situation. They reach an understanding that he is nothing like the person he is perceived to be. The audience is affected by this quotation in Mayella’s case, because it is made clear during the trial scene that she was forced to convict Tom of rape, even if she did not want to because her father treats her even worse, than the way she treats Tom.

    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print

  4. Blog Essay by: Owen Tope

    Atticus Finch is much the same as a cool, wise uncle. In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mocking Bird Atticus, Scout and Jem’s father is more of a laid back loving father and enjoys keeping his children interested in learning and exploring the world and lives they live in rather than a strict ‘no fun’ type of parent. Atticus has his flaws that Jew and Scout pick up easily as any kids would but they both have a great appreciation towards him. He has an equal balance of love, knowledge and tolerance that Jem and Scout respect very much.
    To the delight of Jem, Scout and the their best friend Dill, Atticus gives the kids a lot of freedom for being so young and helpless. The kids don’t understand this, but Atticus lets the children experience life for themselves to teach them lessons. He finds ways to sooth the kids from stress and also understands when is a good time to step in as a parent and give advice and when to let them figure it out on their own. As an example Atticus comforts Scout after a tough first day of school. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view – until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” (Lee 39). This quotation has reflections all over the story and is the main idea of the story.
    Atticus has some flaws that also affect his children. He claims to be too old for games and playing with the kids. Jem asked his father to play in a father, son game of football but attius refused. He would play keep away but when it came time that Jem wanted to tackle him Atticus would say, “Im too old for that, son” (Lee 118). For the most part both children find atticus very uncool and felt they couldn’t talk about him to their friends. Tim Johnson changed that by going mad one day in February leading to Atticus having to act fast and shoot the dog with one bullet. After they find out their father was the straightest shooter in Maycomb in his day.
    For the children, Atticus is a mentor along the way and throughout the book that’s the way he stays. The difference that occurs in Atticus’s character is when he shows Jem and Scout his strengths that they could not see before and they gradually gain respect throughout.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. 50th Anniversary Edition. First Mass Market Edition. ed. New York Boston: Grand Central, 2010.

  5. Atticus’s Parenting; To Kill A Mockingbird

    In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird Atticus is a single parent with two children, Jem and Scout. Scout could never remember her mother and Jem can recall some features of her. The children are warm hearted for Atticus as they will defend him in any way they can. Atticus is a caring and sympathetic father towards his children and a friendly face in their neighbourhood and community. Atticus would try to answer most of the children’s questions in a passionate and formal way. Atticus had taught Scout how to read giving her a boost in school, but is conflicted by the teachers. Atticus has managed to care and support two children with the aid of Calpurnia, their coloured maid. Atticus always ensures safety such as when their neighbours house is ablaze and caring for when they are ambushed and besieged by Bob Ewell.
    When Miss Maudie’s house was ablaze in chapter eight Atticus ensured that the children were to stay away from the fire to keep them safe from the heat and flames extruding from the windows and doors of her house. “ Now listen, both of you. Go down and stand in front of the Radley place. Keep out of the way, do you hear?( Lee 92). Atticus ensures that Jem and Scout would be safe throughout the fire, and they won’t be near it to get hurt. Before Atticus goes to help his neighbours in the crisis of Miss Maudie’s house, Atticus tells Jem to take Scout and run. “Do as I tell you. Run now. Take care of Scout, you hear? ( Lee 92). Even though Jem wanted to run and help Atticus in moving furniture out of the house, but he wanted to keep trust with Atticus and keep the relation between them. Atticus believes that Jem and Scout had retrieved a blanket from their house and broke his promise. Atticus cares for their safety and that more trouble would not happen if he didn’t tell them to go.
    When the novel was nearing the end Jem and Scout are walking back from the disastrous pageant that took place at their school. They are ambushed by Bob Ewell and Jem is beaten up badly. During this time in the Novel Atticus is in his house listening to the radio. Boo Radley carries Jem back to Atticus’s house and Atticus realises the situation. He calls a doctor immediately to ensure the most care of Jem. “Call Dr. Reynolds!” Atticus’s voice came sharply from Jem’s room. “Where’s Scout?” (Lee 353). In a situation so intense and scarring toward a parent, Atticus ensures that everyone is ok and cares for Jem after Dr. Reynolds has left and stay with him for a while. Atticus was calm because he knew that Jem would heal but was quick in calling a doctor unlike the Tom Robinson case. This will instill conscience into Scout because she will learn to call a doctor when something severe happens and not to leave it.
    Atticus is a responsible parent who cares for every person who will affect the way he lives such as his children, Walter Cunningham, Charles Baker Harris, etc. He has a unique parenting style that is relaxed but could be strict depending on the situation. Throughout the novel he has instilled many different examples of conscience into his children and taught them how to look on the brightside of different situations and for Jem to be a gentleman and Scout to be nice to people. The parenting style that Atticus uses is unique considering he is a single father and a lawyer. Atticus always ensures safety and cares much about his children.

    Works Cited

    Lee,Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird.New York/ Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

    By: Jarod Rogers

  6. In Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, Atticus says “ You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39). Throughout To Kill A MockingBird, Scouts childhood revolves around this quotation since she starts to believe rumours she hears around Maycomb. Scout does not understand what Atticus really means by this quotation until she encounters different situations as she grows older.

    During the first day at school, Scout rubs Walter Cunningham’s nose in the dirt and she immediately judges him. When Walter comes for dinner Scout is called into the kitchen by Calpurnia due to Scouts behaviour. Scout says “He ain’t company, Cal, hes just a Cunningham” (Lee 33). This quotation shows that Scout is judging him on who he is and who his father is, when she doesn’t even know Walter. Scout fails to walk in Walter shoes and she doesn’t realize what Walter Cunningham’s life is actually like. As Scout gets older, she begins to understand Atticus advice as she encounters different people and different situations in Maycomb.

    There were so many rumours about Boo Radley before anyone actually knew him. For example people believed that he stabbed his father in the leg with a pair of scissors. “As Mr. Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.”(Lee, page 13). Atticus just wants Scout to see things from other peoples perspective before she goes and judges someone based on other peoples opinions or just on what she sees. Later on in the book Scout also says, “Atticus was right. You never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough” (Lee 374). This quotation shows that Scout has finally considered things for Arthur’s perspective. At the beginning of the book, Scout imagines Boo has a terrifying monster due to all of the horrible rumours there is about him. As Scout gets older and matures she realises maybe Arthur just wanted to stay inside and be away from all the crazy people in Maycomb. Scouts actions throughout the novel shows that she was starting to understand what Atticus said “ You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39).

    In To Kill A Mockingbird Atticus quotation and advice to Scout shows that Scout really grew up in those few years and took in consideration of other peoples point of view. Throughout the book she walked in many different peoples shoes before judging them. At first she would judge people right away but as she got more mature she started to consider things from their perspective.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  7. In the book To Kill A Mockingbird, there are many times where Jean Louise (Scout) learns the lesson “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 30) said by her father, Atticus. Scout throughout the story, realizes that her father’s words are essential in her everyday life. She finds that it is hard to fully comprehend what someone is going through, until she is put into a situation to understand them. There are many times where Scout has to encounter this same obstacle of understanding different views. This is shown through many characters in this story, such as, Mrs. Dubose, Dolphus Raymond, and most importantly Tom Robinson and Arthur (Boo) Radley.
    One of the key topics in this story revolves around the issue of racism. This is shown with Tom Robinson and his court case that Atticus defends. When Scout wonders why her father wants to defend a black man, she soon realizes that she shouldn’t believe the stereotypes and mean things her town says about black people. In Calpurnia’s church, Jem and Scout realize that black people and white people should be treated the same. They see this when Lula tells Calpurnia, “ You ain’t got no business bringin’ white chillun here… It is our church ain’t it?” (Lee 158). When Lula says these words it helps Jem and Scout see the other point of view of how white people treat black people, which puts them into the shoes of the black people. Scout also see’s the injustice of black people when she sees the courtroom case of Tom Robinson. She finally sees through the eyes of what Tom went through and understands that he was being cheated on and blamed for a crime he didn’t do. Atticus also helps Scout see this more clearly when he says, “As you grow older, you’ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don’t you forget it—whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash.” (Lee 295).
    The other person that is an important role in To Kill A Mockingbird is Boo Radley. At the beginning Scout, Dill, and Jem will not leave the Radleys alone. They think that they can convince Boo Radley to see them and that he was scary or mean. But they never understand what Boo’s like until the end. Scout realizes a lot of things she didn’t take into consideration when he saves their lives. At the end of the book, when Scout walks Arthur home, she thinks “Boo’s children needed him. Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.” (Lee 374). She finally comprends this while picturing what Arthur Radley probably saw in the past, and also grasping the kind of person he’s been all along.
    Scout’s lesson on understanding a person’s view is one of the most important lesson in the story to learn from, and for the reader themselves to learn as well. This book portrays a lesson that we can all use to this day into our everyday lives to comprehend the struggles and opinions of others. Scout, looking back to her past, also learn this valuable piece of advice and remembers it very clearly. Remembering it so well must have the significance of carrying Atticus’ words in her memory forever.
    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  8. In To Kill a Mockingbird Atticus Finch faces quite a few troubles relating to the trial, but parenting isn’t one of those trouble. Atticus is a fair man, that always wants people to act as equals, including his children. Atticus is also a good father because he’s always teaching his children with honesty, fairness and kindness.
    Atticus is indeed a lawyer and a good one, with those skills that he used for his work he tries to put towards parenting. Such as treating people as equals and by doing this he gives a good example to his children for when they’re grown up. “You know the truth, and the truth is this: some Negroes lie, some Negroes are immoral, some Negro men are not to be trusted around women—black or white. But this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men. There is not a person in this courtroom who has never told a lie, who has never done an immoral thing, and there is no man living who has never looked upon a woman without desire.” (Lee 273). In this quotation, Atticus explains that just because a man is a black man, doesn’t mean he’s a bad man. Bob Ewell has been a bad man for convicting a crime and then blaming it on a black man, only because he knew that if they were to go to trial that he would lose. This makes Bob Ewell, the white man, the bad man of the situation. Therefore, Atticus is being a good parent for teaching them this, so that in the future they wouldn’t treat others differently.
    Atticus always teaches Jem and Scout with honesty, fairness, and kindness. He shows them that when someone brings you down, you can show them that it doesn’t affect you, just like how it says in this quotation: “Don’t pay any attention to her, just hold your head high and be a gentleman.” (Lee 135). Even though that this quotation from Atticus is speaking to Scout of Mrs. Dubose and she wasn’t the nicest person, that you should be able to have no trouble with being polite, like a gentlemen, to anybody. Also when saying to be a gentlemen, it signifies honor and politeness which not every man has and is a good quality to have which is what atticus is trying to teach Jem and Scout and is something that being a woman doesn’t describe. But, so what if Atticus is a good parent, there is actually a big so what because if he weren’t, then Jem and Scout wouldn’t be the kids that they are, which are loyal and loving kids. If Atticus wasn’t a good parent then Jem and Scout could have ended up like Mayella Ewell, a person who doesn’t really care for others but herself.
    In conclusion, Atticus is good at parenting and has a good relationship with them by showing and telling his children that treating others as there equal is the best possible thing to do. Atticus also always taught them with honesty, fairness and kindness.
    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mocking. New York/Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  9. In the inspiring novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch, father to Jem and Scout Finch, displays a unique, however effective parenting style. He has a very unique and effective parenting style because of his mature relationship with his children since he treats them as equals. He also helps them see the world from different points of view and encourages them to try and see more in people than what meets the eye.

    Firstly, Atticus’s patterning style is unique and effective because he has a very mature relationship with Scout and Jem as he treats them as equals and does not present himself as above them. In the novel Atticus states, “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.” (Lee 149). This is said to Jem in reference to Mrs.Dubose and her previous struggles. It represents that Atticus sees Scout and Jem in such a way that he can be honest and thorough in explaining situations. It also represents how atticus does not hide anything from his children which represents truth and trust. In the novel Atticus shows enough respect to Scout and Jem that they could be considered his comrades as well as children. Atticus treating Jem and Scout this way will help Scout and Jem become better people as well as help them understand mature situations and the world around them. It would also encourage Scout and Jem to promote respect and honesty throughout their lives.

    The second reason why Atticus has a very unique and effective parenting style is that he helps Scout and Jem see the world from different points of view and encourages them to see more in people than what meets the eye. Atticus is a very strong minded father. He believes that you can not judge a book by its cover and that your first perception of someone is often never correct.“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.” (Lee 39). This represents that Atticus believes you should not judge based upon rumours or word of mouth, but it also shows that he believes valuable lessons can be obtained from experience and exposure. This lesson and teaching style is very beneficial to Jem and Scout in the book because it helps them grow and develop as people as well as it helps them understand the world from many valuable perspectives. This helps them become more diverse, full minded young people.

    Without a doubt Jem and Scout are extremely lucky to have Atticus as a father. He has very unique, however effective parenting style. He has this style of parenting because of the adult and equal way he treats his children. He helps them see the world for its bigger picture and allows them to grow and become individuals by better understanding other people.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  10. To Kill A Mockingbird

    In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, Atticus Finch, the father of Jem and Scout Finch, explains “ ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view’ “ (Lee 30). This is portrayed many times throughout the book, most of the time learned by Scout Finch. She interacts with almost every character in the novel, and in the end she realizes the connection between those relationships and the what Atticus said. The two major characters the quotation relates to the most are the situations of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley, both of whom were connected to the saying by Scout.

    The first example of the quotation pertaining to the novel is the situation Tom Robinson finds himself in. Tom is accused of raping Mayella by Mayella herself, while Bob Ewell and Heck Tate back her story up. It becomes apparent that their story is not true, and Scout, along with the rest of the upper balcony, are puzzled that Tom is found guilty. “Guilty…guilty…guilty…guilty…” (Lee 282) polls the jury, and each jury members words pierce through the ears of those listening. Scout later notices how differently the coloured folk are treated, solely based upon their complexion. “ when it’s a white man’s word against a black man’s, the white man always wins.” (Lee 295) explains Atticus to Jem. Basically stating that no matter how obvious the outcome of the trial should be, in the grand scheme of things, it was a black man’s word against a couple of white folk, and Tom Robinson was doomed from the start. No one ever took the chance to walk in Toms shoes and see how he feels to be wronged due to the conscience of a young woman.

    Secondly, Arthur “Boo” Radley was never given the benefit of the doubt, even without ever socializing with anyone, he still has rumors being spread about him. “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him. People said he went out at night when the moon was down, and peeped in windows.” (Lee 10). Which was a quotation expressed by Scout, showing her thoughts of Boo as she indulges in the falsities tossed around through the town. At this point, the isolation by Boo has made everyone come up with their own stories and fantasies about what they believe goes on in the old creepy house. “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.” (Lee 374). When Scout Finch says this, its a turning point in the book where she, Atticus, Jem and Heck Tate realize the true personality of Boo. He saves the two children from death at the hands of Bob Ewell, and Atticus is extremely grateful. Showing that the town assumed things about him without knowing the truth, he was really a good person.

    In conclusion, the quotation “ ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view’ “ (Lee 30) pertains to the novel in many different ways. There are two major examples of this, one being the case of Tom Robinson and the fact that he is convicted over his complexion, and the other being Boo Radley. A secluded man who is nothing but caring for Jem and Scout, but his isolation has brought upon many stories and rumors which are not true. In both of these situations, someone was wronged because others failed to see things from their point of view, to walk around in their shoes or in their skin.

    Works Cited

    Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

    By: Michael Cross

  11. To Kill A Mockingbird

    In the novel, “To Kill A Mockingbird”, Atticus Finch, the father of Jem and Scout Finch, explains “ ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view’ “ (Lee 30). This is portrayed many times throughout the book, most of the time learned by Scout Finch. She interacts with almost every character in the novel, and in the end she realizes the connection between those relationships and the what Atticus said. The two major characters the quotation relates to the most are the situations of Tom Robinson and Boo Radley, both of whom were connected to the saying by Scout.

    The first example of the quotation pertaining to the novel is the situation Tom Robinson finds himself in. Tom is accused of raping Mayella by Mayella herself, while Bob Ewell and Heck Tate back her story up. It becomes apparent that their story is not true, and Scout, along with the rest of the upper balcony, are puzzled that Tom is found guilty. “Guilty…guilty…guilty…guilty…” (Lee 282) polls the jury, and each jury members words pierce through the ears of those listening. Scout later notices how differently the coloured folk are treated, solely based upon their complexion. “ when it’s a white man’s word against a black man’s, the white man always wins.” (Lee 295) explains Atticus to Jem. Basically stating that no matter how obvious the outcome of the trial should be, in the grand scheme of things, it was a black man’s word against a couple of white folk, and Tom Robinson was doomed from the start. No one ever took the chance to walk in Toms shoes and see how he feels to be wronged due to the conscience of a young woman.

    Secondly, Arthur “Boo” Radley was never given the benefit of the doubt, even without ever socializing with anyone, he still has rumors being spread about him. “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him. People said he went out at night when the moon was down, and peeped in windows.” (Lee 10). Which was a quotation expressed by Scout, showing her thoughts of Boo as she indulges in the falsities tossed around through the town. At this point, the isolation by Boo has made everyone come up with their own stories and fantasies about what they believe goes on in the old creepy house. “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.” (Lee 374). When Scout Finch says this, its a turning point in the book where she, Atticus, Jem and Heck Tate realize the true personality of Boo. He saves the two children from death at the hands of Bob Ewell, and Atticus is extremely grateful. Showing that the town assumed things about him without knowing the truth, he was really a good person.

    In conclusion, the quotation “ ‘You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view’ “ (Lee 30) pertains to the novel in many different ways. There are two major examples of this, one being the case of Tom Robinson and the fact that he is convicted over his complexion, and the other being Boo Radley. A secluded man who is nothing but caring for Jem and Scout, but his isolation has brought upon many stories and rumors which are not true. In both of these situations, someone was wronged because others failed to see things from their point of view, to walk around in their shoes or in their skin.

    Works Cited

    Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

    By: Michael Cross

  12. To Kill a Mocking Bird
    In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus has a unique style of parenting which is worked into his busy life as a lawyer and single father. Atticus’ children behave well based off of the way he parents, using lawyering skills as an advantage. He is a very respectful and caring man, setting a good example for his children as well as showing how to be a good parent. Atticus has a very close relationship with both of his children, which shows again how good a parent he is.

    Atticus is very caring, and when something happens to his children, he goes into full on parents mode. When Scout and Jem are attacked by Bob Ewell, Atticus’ first response to the incident is to yell to Aunt Alexandra, “Call Dr. Reynolds!”(Lee, 353) he called Dr. Reynolds for Jem but was also worrying about Scout, “Where’s Scout?” (Lee, 353). Scout may not have realized it at the time, but it was a lesson she will use in the future when she has children of her own, your children are a huge role of your life, they make your life better, that is something Atticus never forgot. He had a huge concern as to where Scout is even though she isn’t hurt. When it comes to Jem however, he is willing to be with him until he awakens, “He turned out the light and went into Jem’s room. He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem waked up in the morning.” (Lee, 376) Even those few words show the love and care Atticus has for his children, he is willing to give up his night sleep to be by his son. Those are just examples of how much Atticus cares, there is however, an example showing his respect. When Atticus drives over to the Robinson home to tell Helen Robinson the news about Tom, he is wanted by Mr. Ewell. When Atticus goes outside the home to speak with him, Mr. Ewell spits in his face. Atticus does not act irrationally, he simply takes out his handkerchief, and wipes his face. This shows Jem, who is waiting in the car, how to be a respectful person. He teaches how Jem should act.

    The “so what” of this is that Atticus’ style of parenting is very unique, but it works. His style of parenting which is worked into his busy life as a lawyer and single father. Atticus’ behave well based off of the way he parents, using lawyering skills as an advantage. He is a very respectful and caring man, setting a good example for his children as well as showing how to be a good parent. Atticus has a very close relationship with both of his children, which shows again how good a parent he is.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  13. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ – Atticus’ Parenting Style – Blog Post
    In the novel, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ by Harper Lee, there are many special relationships developed within the characters. One of the main character developments pertains to Atticus’ parenting style. His relationships to his children are very close although sometimes it does seem like as if he doesn’t care about them at all. Because he is a wise, serious and well-respected man across Maycomb, Alabama, sometimes his emotions do not show through to the audience reading the novel. Atticus is a good parent because he is a very moralistic and a very knowledgeable man. Also, when Atticus Finch hired Calpurnia to be the housemaid for their household, this shows that he cares for his children because he wants them to be protected by Calpurnia.
    One instance that displayed Atticus’ good parenting style is because Atticus Finch is very moralistic to his children. He’s always giving the children new lessons are morals to help them learn and become better people in Maycomb, Alabama. For example, a lesson that he told Scout was the following quotation from the novel : “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (Lee 39). This is one of Atticus’ best moral for Scout and this takes her through the book because at the end of the novel, she isn’t afraid of Arthur (Boo) Radley anymore, now that she’s grown up and stood on the Radley porch by herself after she walked him home. Another moral that Atticus explained to Jem is the following quotation from the novel : “I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot at all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird … Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it is a sin to kill a mockingbird” (Lee 119). When Scout heard Atticus say that it was a sin to do something, she went to ask Miss Maudie Atkinson. Miss Maudie explained that mockingbirds don’t do anything to harm humans and that all they do is create music for us to enjoy. Scout understood what Miss Maudie meant and therefore the come to realize that perhaps Boo Radley may be a mockingbird. In the audience’s perspective, the idea of a mockingbird is a symbol and Boo Radley represents this symbol because he has a kind heart, he is very generous by leaving the small gifts in the knothole for the children to find, and he sewed up Jem’s pants by hand when they got torn in the fence. By doing what Atticus does, he shows Jem and Scout how to become better people and how to treat people with respect. Atticus believes that everyone should be treated fairly so that is how he treats his children.
    Another instance that displayed Atticus’ good parenting style is when Atticus hired Calpurnia as a housemaid to help protect his children. Although Calpurnia is black, she is well-educated and she can be very strict. A quotation from the novel is : “That boy’s yo’ comp’ny and if he wants to eat up the table cloth you let him, you hear?” (Lee 32). This quotation is said by Calpurnia and it shows that Calpurnia is strict and very polite because she knows her manners and knows how to treat guests when they have company over. Along with Atticus, Calpurnia knows what’s right and what’s wrong so they both try to teach the children, Jem and Scout, what’s wrong and what’s right. Therefore, when Calpurnia sees something that the children have done wrong, she will think of an appropriate punishment for them. She seems like a good mother in a sense because she seems to know how to discipline Jem and Scout when they’ve caused some trouble. Atticus is a single father and believes that he needs some help to protect his children. If he didn’t want to care for his children, he wouldn’t have hired Calpurnia as a housemaid in the first place. When Scout thought that Calpurnia was being mean to her, she talked Atticus into trying to get rid of her but he refused. Atticus said the following quotation in the novel : “I’ve no intention of getting rid of her, now or ever. We couldn’t operate a single day without Cal, have you ever thought of that? You think about how much Cal does for you, and you mind her, you hear?” (Lee 33). This made Scout think in a way, because of all Calpurnia has done for her and Jem. Atticus can also be very stern and he believes in Calpurnia to take good care of the children and insists that no one is to kick her out of the house by saying the following quotation from the book : “Alexandra, Calpurnia’s not leaving this house until she wants to. You may think otherwise, but I couldn’t have got along without her all these years. She’s a faithful member of this family and you’ll simply have to accept things the way they are. Besides, sister, I don’t want you working your head off for us – you’ve no reason to do that. We still need Cal as much as we ever did” (Lee 182-183). This explains the emotions that Atticus has for Calpurnia. He believes that Calpurnia is a very important part of the Finch household and no one has the right to kick her out. Especially under Scout’s circumstances, because Calpurnia was a little strict on her, Scout thinks that Atticus should get Calpurnia to pack up her things and leave. Obviously, Atticus will not let her go unless she wants to leave. Because Atticus hired Calpurnia as their housemaid, he believes that Calpurnia will take good care of Jem and Scout. Besides disciplining the children, she ensures that they are well-nourished and hygienic at all times. She guards the children when there is trouble such as when Miss Maudie’s house was caught on fire. Atticus told her to make sure Jem and Scout stayed where they were and away from the fire.
    In conclusion, Atticus has an interesting parenting style towards his children. He is a very wise and intelligent man. Atticus cares for his children, although sometimes his feelings and emotions do not show through, being a lawyer and all. His unique style for parenting includes being very moralistic to Jem and Scout as well as hiring Calpurnia as their housemaid, showing that he cares deeply for the well-being of his children. Without Calpurnia, Atticus wouldn’t be as successful as he is now and he wouldn’t be able to continue on in life without her. He believes that Calpurnia is a crucial part of the Finch household as she provides so much for his children. She protects them when Atticus goes off to defend someone in court and she also prepares the meals that the children eat daily. She is also very moralistic, like Atticus, and disciplines them when they’ve done something wrong. She can also be very loving and seems to care for the children as much as Atticus does. Atticus is also very smart and moralistic. He teaches the children their rights and wrongs so that they can be better people.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  14. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, has been ground breaking novel for many years because of its powerful influences on its readers. It is an inspiring novel about a widowed father, named Atticus Finch, who leads by example and teaches his children the important skill of being open minded. Atticus states, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39). This quotation is important in the novel because it teaches Scout to be empathetic when trying to understand people around her. It pertains to the novel through her perception of many different characters, mainly Mrs. Dubose and Mr. Arthur “Boo” Radley.

    The first way that this quotation relates to the novel is through the character, Mrs. Dubose, and her struggle with death. When first introduced to Mrs. Dubose, she comes across as nothing but an impolite old lady. But after Atticus makes his children read to her regularly, it is soon clear that Mrs. Dubose has gone through many difficult experiences in her lifetime, and that she is very ill. Atticus states, “She was the bravest person I ever knew” (Lee 149). This proves that even though she was always awful to Atticus, he understood why because he used his own advice and put himself “in her skin”. Atticus knew that if he was her, and going through the same pain and suffering, he would be just the same. He taught his children to look from her point of view and to see her as a whole, instead of her broken parts. Scout gains knowledge in this part of the novel, because she uses Atticus’s advice. Mrs. Dubose strongly puts Atticus’s quotation in practise, that you can only understand a person when you see things from their point of view.

    Secondly, this quotation relates to the novel through the mysterious character, Arthur “Boo” Radley. There are many bad rumours that spread around the town of Maycomb, mostly about Boo. At the start of the book, Jem and Scout thought of Boo as a dangerous and horrifying man. Jem quotes, “Boo was about six-and-a-half feet tall, judging from his tracks; he dined on raw squirrels and any cats he could catch, that’s why his hands were bloodstained—if you ate an animal raw, you could never wash the blood off. There was a long jagged scar that ran across his face; what teeth he had were yellow and rotten; his eyes popped, and he drooled most of the time” (Lee 65). This shows that at first, Jem and Scout base their thoughts of Boo strictly off what they’ve heard about him. But after he saves their lives, it’s clear to them that they have the wrong impression of him. “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough” (Lee 374). This quotation shows that Scout relates the advice that her father gave her to Boo. When she puts herself in Boo’s shoes, she feels empathy for him. As she begins to understand, she is less scared of him. The reader can tell that she isn’t afraid anymore because in the end of the novel she calls him Mr. Arthur Radley, instead of Boo. When Scout sees things from Arthur’s point of view, she understands why he is the way he is. That’s how Atticus’s quotation pertains to Mr Arthur Radley.

    The quotation, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39). by Atticus Finch is one of the many themes found in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. This quotation relates to many characters throughout the novel, but mainly to Mrs. Dubose and Mr. “Boo” Radley. Not only does it relate to all of the characters in the novel, but its application to everyday life is crucial in today’s society. Once you learn to be empathetic to people around you, you will understand them better. This quotation is the reason why, To Kill a Mockingbird, is a timeless novel. If more people could learn to empathize, the way Scout has been taught to, we would have a much happier world.

    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

    By: Alana Krzeczkowski

  15. To Kill A Mockingbird
    Atticus’ Parenting Style

    In “To kill a mockingbird”, Atticus was a single father who took great pride in his job as a lawyer but also as a father. Many would consider him too strict and maybe by some standards he was, but in the end he exceeded at setting his children, Jem and Scout on a path towards a different way of living and thinking. It is evident that his main goals were to instill good moral values into his children, to help them see things in a way most would not. Not by telling but by leading by example. Also, treating them as equal human beings not incompetent children. His relationship with Jem and Scout was built off these things, making for a unique bond.
    Although Atticus was busy as a lawyer, each day he would come home from work and use his skills to help steer Jem and Scout away from the unethical ideas that many citizens of Maycomb possesed. Throughout the novel, he continually proved his morals and views right to his children through example. When Jem was furious because every night when he and Scout went to meet Atticus Mrs Dubose would say nasty things, Atticus said, “You just hold your head high and be a gentleman.”(Lee, 133). Not only would Atticus tell Jem to do so and behave, he would lead by example. “Good Evening, Mrs.Dubose. You look like a picture this evening.” (Lee, 133). Atticus knew he and Mrs. Dubose had conflicting interests but did not let that stop him from sticking to the same moral he told Jem.
    Children tend to be put to lower standards than adults simply because they are younger. However Atticus speaks to Jem and Scout as if he were speaking to Aunt Alexandra or anyone else in Maycomb. He does not sugar coat anything or holds anything back. For him, it is what it is. “It is an agreement reached by mutual concessions. It works this way, if you will concede the necessity of going to school we’ll go on reading every night just as we always do.” (Lee, 41). In this quotation, Atticus was explaining to Scout what a compromise is. Compromise, a deal between two equals.
    In conclusion, Atticus the single hardworking father of two devoted much of his time towards his children overall well being. Atticus used his skills as a lawyer to his advantage, to instill conscience into Jem and Scout also treat them as equals.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  16. To Kill A Mockingbird – Atticus’s parenting style
    In the book, To Kill a Mockingbird we meet the father of two young children, Atticus Finch. When his wife died he was left to take care of young Jem and Scout by himself. To make sure his children grow up to be proper young adults, Atticus’s parenting styles are very unique and very modern, contrary to 1930’s era where the book is based. Atticus treats his kids with respect and equality, and always makes sure that they respect and treat other people with equality, as well. He also made sure they stopped stooping down to the other towns peoples low levels of scum.
    Throughout To Kill a Mockingbird there are many occasions when Atticus demonstrates to Jem and Scout how equality and respect works. When Atticus takes Tom Robinson’s trial of being accused rape, he is taking the case of a black man and defending it. Contrary to the era they live in, where white people over power the black people, Atticus sees them as equal in his eyes. He uses Toms case, where infact the black man is innocent and the white man refuses to admit it, to demonstrate not only to his children, but the whole county that humans, regardless of race, ethnicity, or beliefs, are all equal. When Miss Maudie – the Finch’s neighbour from across the street, elaborates on Atticus’s rule “it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird” (Lee 119), she says “Your fathers right, Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy” (Lee 119) She is explaining that what Atticus means is, they did not do anything for Jem and Scout to hurt them, so they simply should not be hurting them.
    The Maycomb County, where the Finches live, is filled and fueled by gossiping, low-life attitudes, and is a place where people are more concerned about blindly following traditions rather than actually seeing the good in someone or giving them a chance, Atticus on the other hand, he tries to see the good in everyone and takes the high road to teach his kids that aswell. During the movie, when Bob Ewell stops by Tom Robinson’s now widowed wife’s house while Atticus is passing on the news of Tom’s death, he spits right in Atticus’s face. Atticus, being the bigger person, does not do a single thing but wipe the spit off his face, knowing Jem is sitting in the car watching all this happen. There is also other times where Atticus is trying to get Scout to be less physical when she gets antagonized by her peers at school. He says “Try fighting with your head for a change…it’s a good one, even if it does resist learning.” (Lee 76) He is trying to show her, the hurting others because of their actions, is not the right answer and she should always be mindful of what other people say because; “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view’” (Lee 30).
    Over all, yes Atticus is a good parent, but he is also an excellent role model in the Maycomb County for everyone. During the case he not only demonstrates that equality and respect are rights, but that they should be an obvious thing to humanity. He also takes the high road to situations and makes sure that he sees things from other peoples perspective before he makes his opinions. Throughout the book, he is just trying to get his kids to do the same.

    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  17. To Kill a Mockingbird

    In the book “To Kill a Mockingbird”, Atticus the father of Jem and Scout, has a different way of parenting than most parents. Being a single father and a lawyer, Jem and Scout don’t get the attention that all kids get. Not being home as much as he would like to and the children not having a parent at home changes the way Atticus raises his children. In Atticus’ eyes he thinks being strict and treating them as adults will help them grow and appreciate their elders, but in Jem and Scout’s eyes they think he’s being mean and to strict. Atticus’ relationship with his children is all about respect. Atticus believes that all people no matter what colour or where you’re from deserve to be treated with respect, and thats exactly how Atticus treats his children. Atticus seeks to instill conscience in Jem and Scout by telling them the importance of being polite and treating everyone fairly.

    Atticus being a single father and a lawyer, his children Jem and Scout don’t get the attention that all kids need. Not being home as much as he would like to and the children not having a parent at home changes the way Atticus raises his children. Atticus is more of a laid back father but is very strict and wants the best for his children. “ You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 39). This quotation shows that Atticus has respect to all people and wants his children to treat everyone fairly and that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. This quotation also shows what kind of a person Atticus is. Always the one not to judge people by their looks and tries to teach that to his children.

    Atticus’ relationship with his children is all about respect. Atticus believes that all people no matter what colour or where you’re from deserve to be treated with respect, and thats exactly how Atticus treats his children. “It`s not okay to hate anybody”(Lee 330). This quotation shows exactly what kind of a person Atticus is. No matter what the person has done you’ve got to have respect for the person because you don’t know what’s going on with him and his family that might have caused someone to do something bad.

    Atticus being a single father and a lawyer has a different way of raising his children. Atticus has a great relationship with his children and has a lot to do with respect. Atticus believes that all people no matter what colour or where you’re from deserve to be treated with respect. Atticus seeks to instill conscience in Jem and Scout by telling them the importance of being polite and treating everyone fairly.

  18. In the book To Kill A Mocking Bird. The widowed lawyer and father of Jem and Scout, better known as Atticus Finch has a very different parenting style compared to the average parent. Atticus makes sure to teach his children that everybody is equal no matter what or who they are. Atticus makes a very strong point against racism and hating others by saying “It’s not ok to hate anybody”(336,Lee) He says this in reply to Scout when she says that she hates Hitler and this quotation ties back into the point that Atticus believes that it is very important that everyone is treated as equals.

    Atticus has a very strong and respectful relationship with his children no matter how much grief they may cause him. Atticus is always there for Jem and Scout and he always is trying his best to help his children and do what is best for them. They all love each other very much and Atticus is always trying to give the children advice so that they can learn from there mistakes which will then lead to them better better people in the future.

    Atticus has a great parenting style because he gives his children respect and makes them be responsible for what they do. I think a motto that Atticus follows is to treat others the way you want to be treated. This describes Atticus because he so strongly believes that we are all equal. This is said by Miss Maudie, “Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on public streets” (61,Lee) What Miss Maudie was trying to say about Atticus is that he acts the same to everyone no matter where he is.

    Atticus was a single parent for most of his children life and he did an amazing job and much better then any other parent in there time. He taught Jem and Scout many great life lessons but if the children were to learn one thing from there father it is that everyone is equal and should all be treated with the most respect.

    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1960. Print.

  19. Atticus Finch : A Creative Parent

    In the novel, To Kill a Mocking Bird, Atticus Finch’ s unique, and successful parenting style becomes evident during times in the book where his children need him the most. Atticus guides his children through all of the flak that they receive as a result of Tom Robinson’s court case. He proves to his children that all of the racism that goes on in the world is not tolerable, despite what others would have them believe. Atticus has proved to be a very successful and unorthodox parent.
    When word gets out that Atticus Finch will be representing Tom Robinson in court, the Town of Maycomb do not take kindly to his choice. This is because it is a southern town where most of the people are still racist as a result of the slavery that was once prominent in the southern United States. Due to the fact that Tom Robinson is a black man, Atticus and his children, being white, received a great deal of flak from a variety of people in the town. However, through all of the nonsense that goes on, Atticus guides his children the whole way and ensures that they attain a great deal of valuable life lessons through all of their troubles. Atticus proves his parenting methods when his kids have an altercation with Mrs. Dubose. She says to Jem “Your father is no better than the trash that he works for.”(Lee 135) This whole debacle proves that Atticus is an amazing parent because throughout the entire situation he treats his children as if they were his own age and guides them through the entire situation, turning it into a lesson that will serve them well later on in the novel.
    Throughout the novel Atticus proves to his kids that all of the racism around them is not tolerable, despite what others would have them believe. Atticus does this over the course of the entire book. However, he really drives this point home when he is outside of the jailhouse, ready to risk his life in order to save Tom Robinsons life. The children witness their father protecting Tom Robinson but it is not until he says “Mr. Cunningham is basically a good man he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us.” (Lee 210) that he uses this experience to teach his kids a life lesson. This proves that Atticus’ parenting style is very successful, as the kids become a few of the town’s only non racist people.
    Atticus’ unorthodox parenting style seems to be working for him, as he teaches his kids to strive for the very best and to treat people, no matter what their skin colour is, completely equal and with the utmost respect. Atticus also proves that his parenting style is successful as he is always there for his children when they need him most as was the case when his family was taking all the flak for Tom Robinson’s court case. All things considered Atticus is a successful father throughout the course of the entire novel.

    Works Cited
    Lee. Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print

  20. Parents in today’s society shows many different experiences, skills, or techniques on how they take care of their children. Parents can be harsh or strict, really loving or caring, they can be both, or something else. In the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch shows a great example of how parents should be like. Atticus’s relationship with his children shows the abundant love and understanding that they get and the love and understanding that he receives. Also, he seek instill conscience in his children by illustrating in a wise, affectionate, and fair manner.

    Atticus is a single parent that deeply cares about his children. He shows understanding and consideration towards his children. This affects Jem and Scout Finch to respect Atticus but, they also love him for being considerate and sympathetic. For instance, when Atticus made a compromise with Scout about reading with him, because her teacher said that she can’t read with her father anymore, Atticus said, “If you’ll concede the necessity of going to school, we’ll go on reading every night just as we always have. Is it a bargain?” (Lee 41) This quotation shows that Atticus really cares for Scout because he knows that Scout really loves to read. He shows that he is understanding and will comfort his children when they are in need. Thence, Atticus’s actions influenced his children thoroughly.

    His way of insinuating his children is by illustrating through words and actions in a wise, and fair style. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (Lee 39) This quotation occurred when Scout was talking to Atticus about her problems at school; how her teacher said that Atticus was teaching Scout something wrong. Atticus took the problem in and he gave Scout an advice or a moral on it, so that Scout, could be able to grow from it and to learn. Another example is in the movie, Jem was sitting in the car and saw Bob Ewell spat on Atticus’s face. Instead of Atticus cussing at him or taking revenge on Mr.Ewell, he wiped his face and went inside the car, showing his courtesy and acting like a true gentleman. This scene made Jem, to gain from the courteous action. Atticus’s actions and words really struck the children to know what is right and what is wrong through his wisdom and his gentle manner.

    To conclude, Atticus’s unique way of parenting gave his children an everlasting relationship that taught them to respect and to act righteously. He also, seek instill conscience in his children by illustrating through words and actions of courtesy and in a gentleman like manner, inspiring his children to grow from it and to learn from its way. Atticus shows abundant love and never ending knowledge to his children, even though he is a single parent. He is an example of what parents should be like.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  21. Sam Toward
    ENG 2D1
    Ms. Cox
    April 17, 2015

    To Kill a Mockingbird: Blog Post

    In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird the father of the two main characters Jem and Scout, Atticus Finch, shows off a very unique way of parenting that proves to be very effective in teaching his children vital information about society, how to act, by showing them what to do, and how to be the bigger man/woman in the situation. He treats his children like they are adults and shows them with the same amount of respect as he would with any other human being. During the book there are so many times where Atticus gives them valuable lessons that teach them the right from the wrong. The two main points that show off Atticus’s unique parenting style that prove to be the best ways to raise a child in this time period would have to include when Atticus would let the children go with Calpurnia to church, and have her raise the children while he was away at work or out for the day, the other way that Atticus’s unique parenting style is shown off is when Atticus get spit on by Bob Ewell and doesn’t react just shows his child that he is the bigger man by walking away.

    Atticus shows that he does not limit his boundaries or mind by being prejudiced to the other races at the time. He shows this letting his black maid Calpurnia take care of the kids. At this time it was unheard of to do that. But Atticus gave faith and trusted Calpurnia to take care of his kids that same way the he would. Another way that Atticus tried to teach his kids not to be prejudiced and to treat all equal was when Scout came to her Father as asked if he was a black man lover. This quotation “Do you defend black men, Atticus?” (Lee 99) when Atticus replies with “Of course I do. Don’t say black man, Scout. That’s common.” (Lee 99). With these two quotations we can see the style of parenting that Atticus is trying to getting across to his children, he is trying to install on his children that all people are equal and you are somewhat inferior for calling them that.

    The last reason on why Atticus’s unique parenting style seems to be the best fit for this time period and helps his kids understand the right from the wrong. When Atticus goes to tell Helen Robison that Tom is dead, Bob Ewell calls for outside of the house. When Atticus comes out and starts to talk to Bob, Bob decides to spit in his face. Atticus’s knows that Jem is in the car and watching what his dad is doing. So Atticus shows his son a lesson and does the right thing at the same time by getting out a handkerchief and wiping his face and leaving. Atticus knows that he is going to have to deal with something when Bob Ewell calls for him “You go on in there and get Atticus Finch.” (Mulligan) Once Atticus heard that he knew that he would have to deal with the situation and most likely in the best and most appropriate manner to show his son how to deal with these people and situations.

    In the end we see that Atticus’s parenting style has proven off and his children have taken all of the lessons that he has given them. By showing them it doesn’t matter the person who raises you or the people that you are around and who you defend, or that your actions are what make you and by having bad actions and getting in fights gets you nowhere in the long run. Atticus have a different parenting style but it pays off in the end.

    Works Cited

    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print

    Mulligan, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. Universal Studios, 1962. Film

  22. To Kill a Mockingbird
    Atticus Finch is the father of Scout Finch and Jem Finch in the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”. Being the father of the protagonist makes his character extremely relevant in the development of Scout. Atticus is the primary role model for both of his children and he looks to pass on his beliefs to better their attitudes and tolerance towards others. Atticus is a lawyer who is renowned for defending Tom Robinson, a black man who is falsely accused of the rape of Mayella Ewell. Unlike most other citizens of Maycomb County, the protagonist’s home town, Atticus believes that everybody should be treated equally and given a fair chance despite their race. Atticus also manages to not resort to violence, even when provoked by others. Also, even the worst people, with little-to-no redeeming qualities, manage to shine in some way in Atticus’s eyes. Atticus tries his hardest to instill his beliefs in equality, peacefulness, and optimism in his children throughout the novel. Atticus’s parenting style is full of compromises and fairness. Atticus believes that his children are equal to him and deserve fair treatment and independence despite their young age. Also, since Scout and Finch have never grown up with a mother figure, Atticus manages to successfully fulfill both a father’s and mother’s roles
    Maycomb Country is full of prejudice and hate towards those of a darker skin tone. The black population is looked upon as minorities and the majority of Maycomb believe they are their lesser. Atticus is one of the very few citizens who believe in otherwise. Atticus wants nothing more than for his children to grow up with a healthy and grounded attitude. Atticus mainly does this by showing his children that the blacks are no different than anybody else. A quote from Atticus that represents this thought is when he says to scout, “”As you grow older you’ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don’t you forget it— whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, of how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash.” (Harper 200) In this quote Atticus displays to his kids that no matter what race somebody is they deserve equality. This quote shows the readers that Atticus tries his hardest to teach his kids what is morally right and wrong.
    Scout and Jem have lived their whole lives without a mother in their family as their mom died when they were at a young age. Atticus has a tough time being a single father as he has to become both a mother and father role for his children. Atticus spends much of his time raising his children; this is strange as in this time period this task was looked upon as a mother’s job. Some of the lessons Atticus teaches his children is to never resort to violence as well as seeing redeeming qualities in people rather than their faults. A quote in the novel and scene in the film that represent Atticus teaching these beliefs are, “I wanted you to see something about her—I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do. Mrs. Dubose won, all ninety-eight pounds of her. According to her views, she died beholden to nothing and nobody. She was the bravest person I ever knew.” (Harper 112) This quote shows the reader that Atticus looks past the evil in Mrs. Dubose and admires her courage, her seemingly only redeeming quality. The scene in the movie that demonstrates Atticus’ belief in peace rather than violence is when Bob Ewell spits in Atticus’ face and Atticus simply walks away. This act shows Jem, who watches the display, that violence wouldn’t have solved anything and sometimes the best solution is peace. As well as teaching his children right from wrong, Atticus also treats his children as equals and offers them compromises to ensure their happiness. Atticus knows that children like to be independent, and he gives Scout and Jem their respective privacy.
    Atticus is an ideal parent who properly teaches his children morals, proper beliefs, and optimism while giving them proper respect, equality, and privacy. Atticus successfully parents his children as both a mother and father role. Atticus’ parenting style should be admired, his relationship with his children is healthy, and he successfully instills conscience in Scout and Jem. Atticus is all together a great parent and a great man.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  23. The classic novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” portrays the story of Scout and Jem and the discriminatory issues that occur in Maycomb County. Many characters are misunderstood in this small town and a powerful moment in the novel occurs when Atticus states, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 30). This quotation pertains to the novel as it highlights the lack of understanding between characters. Tom Robinson is criticized for his actions, even though they were justified at the time. Arthur “Boo” Radley is constantly part of the town gossip, although their talk is unsubstantiated and full of rumors.
    When Atticus is questioning Tom in the courthouse, Tom reveals that he did not fight back in self-defense. The jury sees this as suspicious as this act would not be against the law. Considering the circumstances, Scout did not understand this either until she later questioned Atticus about what he meant by his statement. She realized that, “He would not have dared strike a white woman under any circumstances and expect to live long” (Lee 260) based on racial differences. A jury full of white men could never possibly understand what it would be like to be a black man where they lived. This relates back to Atticus’ quote because if the jury considered things from Tom’s point of view, the final verdict potentially would have been different.
    Another character that was greatly misunderstood in the novel was Boo Radley. The town circulated the rumor that he killed his parents without even consulting Boo himself. People should not be so quick to gossip about others until they understand situations others are going through. If they understood why he stayed inside, maybe they would not have tried so hard to make him come out. Scout was afraid of Boo all her life until she realized that he was not who she thought he was after he saved her and Jem’s life. After she walked him home she states, “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough” (Lee 374). Jem also begins to learn more about Boo and his lifestyle as he grows older. In a conversation to Scout he says, “I think I’m beginning to understand why Boo Radley’s stayed shut up in the house all this time . . . it’s because he wants to stay inside” (Lee 304). Jem considers the idea that Boo sees all the prejudices and hypocrisy in their and choses to stay inside rather than be a part of it.
    In “To Kill a Mockingbird” Atticus says a powerful quotation that changes the way Scout thinks of people. He states, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 30). This is evident in the story as it relates back to two main characters. This quotation relates to Tom Robinson as people were more focused on judging him by his colour, not the actual situation. It also relates to Arthur “Boo” Radley because although everyone talks about him, no one has taken the time to really understand him. This quotation aids Scout in understanding that others have their own unique perspectives based on their own experiences, and that you should never judge them for them.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  24. Many lessons could be pulled out of, Harper Lee’s novel, “To Kill a Mockingbird” but only one main theme is most relevant to the way the whole novel unfolds : “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 30). This theme can be considered a lesson by the father of Jem and Scout, Atticus. At the beginning of the novel, Scout and Jem are seen as stubborn children as they do not do anything for the sake of their father and seem clueless and uneducated on how everything works in life. As the story continues, the children have a great change in personalities in all aspects as a result of Atticus teaching Jem, Scout and Dill valuable life lessons that would affect them for the rest of their lives.
    The first piece of evidence of Scout having bad manners is when she invited over Walter Cunningham and Walter does something Scout is not use to seeing. As Walter went to pour molasses on his dinner he poured the whole pitcher onto his plate leaving Scout in shock as she said : “He would have probably poured it into his milk glass had I not asked what in the sam hill he was doing” (Lee 32). This shows Scouts lack of understanding why Walter was doing so and how it was impolite to ask him in the tone that she did. Atticus explained to Scout that the Cunninghams were not wealthy and strive to make a living out of their farm life. As Atticus later explains to Scout why he was doing so Scout understood that it was because the depression hit them the hardest and that Walter would take advantage in any chance he got, and in this case it was a prestigious chance for walter.If Atticus had never told her what was going on, Scout would have jumped to conclusions and thought that Walter was simply wasting food or was doing it for fun. In between the storyline is where all the children develop the most and represent the lessons they have learned from their adventures, Dill is seen as one of those characters and is always fascinated with the way that there is a Boo Radley and that he will go through any means possible to get Boo to come out : “We’re askin’ him real politely to come out sometimes, and tell us what he does in there—we said we wouldn’t hurt him and we’d buy him an ice cream.” . This quotation shows that Dill is meaning to bring Boo out and does not mean any harm in doing so. This shows that Dill cannot relate to Atticus quotation because he has not seen what it is like to be Boo Radley and how he sees everyone and everything. In chapter 14 when Dill returns to Maycomb County he tells Scout that his family did not need him and that, “they didn’t want me with ’em … they do get on a lot better without me” (Lee 190-191). At this point of the novel because of how Dill is treated he can now see how Boo feels and that he might not have anywhere to run off to. This experience shows that Dill has learned for his own general experience and has done what Atticus states as walking in someone else shoes. It connects to the theme that Atticus was telling Scout because at the beginning all Dill wanted to do was bug Boo Radley but in the end he came to realize what Boo was going through and went on to relate what was going on to himself and leave Boo alone.
    Near the end of the book readers really get a taste in how Scout has grown herself as a character and is pertaining to what Atticus was telling her in the beginning of the story . In chapter 19,During Tom Robinson’s case she realized that Mayella Ewell did this because : “As Tom Robinson gave his testimony, it came to me that Mayella Ewell must have been the loneliest person in the world” (Lee 256). This shows the readers that now rather than Scout judging people based off what they do and what she sees them do, but she stops and thinks about how it would be like from the other person’s perspective.Scout understands that Mayella is not doing this because she wants to protect her father, but is doing this because he abuses her, and she could not say anything about him or what he did to her because as she testified he was looking her dead in the face and by the fear striking her she would have not been able to tell the truth and face her abuser. Unlike Dill, Scout has progressed in ways that she can imagine being in the other persons place without ever undergoing what they went through and showing how she thought Mayella was lonely when Scout, herself was never in such a case. In progression to Scout and Dill, Jem also starts showing major progression in the ways when he talks to scout in Chapter 24 as they are about to go to bed he depicts the types of people in Maycomb: “There’s four kinds of folks in the world. There’s the ordinary kind like us and the neighbors, there’s the kind like the Ewells down at the dump, and the Negroes” (Lee 302), and with this, he also says that Boo does not come outside because: “he wants to stay inside” (Lee 304). These quotes show us that Jem is saying that there are many different types of people in this world, there are many that can be nice but others who have are seen as bad but can also be good, this is the point of the novel where Jem follows Atticus’s famous quote.
    In the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” there are many types of people throught. The father of Jem and Scout, Atticus is really one of the most important characters and has the biggest influence on the kids. The kids are special because they discover many life lessons at a very young age and shows the readers that what three one of a kind children can do is they have a good role model to go by.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.
    By: Alarabi, Mohamed

  25. Carlin Saunders, Grade 10 English Period 1

    One of the most important themes of the classic American novel To Kill a Mockingbird is the idea that “you never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view” (Lee 30). The concept presented in this quotation is, in the context of what takes place in To Kill a Mockingbird, especially relevant to Scout and Jem’s interactions with Ms Dubose, to Scout, Jem, and Dill’s beliefs about Boo Radley, and how most of the white residents of Maycomb perceive their black counterparts.

    Mrs. Dubose is an irritable and angry old woman who lives near the Finches. She constantly criticizes people for everything they do, and the children believe rumors that she hides a Confederate States of America-era pistol under her dress to shoot anyone who comes too near to her. Both Jem and Scout despise her because of her hate-filled attitude, and especially for insulting Atticus and their mother. Later, however, they discover that she was constantly in such a horrid mood because she was terminally ill and had courageously decided to end her addiction to morphine before she died. Atticus calls her “the bravest person I ever knew” (Lee 116), and eventually Jem and Scout appreciate Mrs. Dubose’s decision to break free of her addiction even though it caused her to be so miserable. This demonstrates how, although they may have hated her beforehand, the children were more understanding of her intolerance once they understood the circumstances she was enduring.

    Another situation in the novel in which the children’s perspective on someone changes once they realize that person’s circumstances is in the case of Arthur “Boo” Radley. At the beginning of the novel Scout, Jem, and Dill consider him a mythical and elusive madman, who it would be amusing to try and tempt out of his house. However, near the end of the novel, after he saves Scout’s and Jem’s lives, Scout begins to appreciate that he is an actual person and that their constant earlier attempts to torment him were unjust. Thus, once again, the children understood they were mistaken after considering the situation from another perspective.

    One of the most significant aspects of To Kill a Mockingbird is the racism shown by many of Macomb’s white residents against the black residents of the town. In one very significant example, Tom Robinson is convicted of raping Mayella Ewell and sentenced to death despite clear evidence that he is not guilty. Reverend Sykes remarks “I ain’t ever seen any jury decide in favor of a colored man over a white man” (Lee 212), which of course proves that this discrimination is far from uncommon in Maycomb. In the book, most of the racist characters are racist simply because they do not commonly interact with, nor are they willing to interact with, anyone of a different race, whereas Atticus, the children, and the other not-racist characters personally know black residents and are not condescending towards them. This relates to the concept of not judging without being in someone’s situation, as it shows that the characters who actually know people of other races as individual people and understand their lives and difficulties are not hateful and prejudiced because of their increased understanding of other people’s situations. This is opposed to the racist characters who refuse to consider that those who they hate are people just like themselves who, like all people, have both negative and positive qualities about them. In this regard the fact that some Maycomb residents judge people based on the colour of their skin, as opposed to their individual merits, is both important to the novel and relates to the concept of considering things from another’s point of view.

    In short, the concept of not judging people without knowing their situation is incredibly important in To Kill a Mockingbird, as shown by how it relates to the children’s interactions with Mrs. Dubose and Boo Radley, and to race relations in Maycomb. Without this concept of mutual understanding, much of what the reader takes from the book would be lost.

  26. In the 1930’s racism towards people of African descent was the norm. Parents passed on their beliefs to their children because that’s what their parents taught them. However, Atticus Finch is a rare exception to this pattern. Atticus, the father of Jem and Scout, taught his children to value everyone equally regardless of skin colour. Atticus shows his children a lot of respect, he treats them as equals despite the age difference. Atticus Finch is an exceptional father because he teaches Jem and Scout the importance of equality and treats them like mature, rational people.

    For Jem and Scout, Atticus is their biggest role model. Atticus influences how Jem and Scout think and act on a daily basis. The children see firsthand how their father, an attorney, fought against overwhelming public opinion to help Tom Robinson, a black man. This is seen when Scout asks her dad about the trial, “You aren’t really a n****r-lover, then, are you?” “ I certainly am. I do my best to love everybody…” (108 Lee) Atticus demonstrates through his actions and interactions with his children that he treats everyone equally. Scout shows Atticus’ parenting style is working when she begins to see Boo Radley as a human being. “Mr. Arthur, bend your arm down here, like that. That’s right, sir.” (278 Lee) Boo is no longer just a ghost story to Scout and this is because Atticus has taught her equality.

    Atticus doesn’t try to pretend the world is perfect for his children, he explains the flaws in society to Jem and Scout. Atticus gives Jem and Scout a lot of freedom to learn and experience for themselves. Against aunt Alexandra’s wishes Atticus allows Jem and Scout to see the verdict on Tom Robinson’s case. Atticus lets the children attend because he wanted them to understand that everything doesn’t turn out the way it should. This helps Jem and Scout to mature and learn the ways of their community. “Well, it’d be sort of like shootin a mocking-bird wouldn’t it” (276 Lee) Scout says this to Atticus when she understands why sheriff Tate keeps it a secret that Boo Radley saved her. Scout realizes Boo Radley is a mocking-bird thanks to Atticus.

    The relationship between Atticus and his children is very unique. Clearly Atticus’ parenting style shapes his children’s way of thinking. Through guidance from Atticus and their own experiences Jem and Scout develop into mature, understanding people who know the significance of equality.

    Works Cited
    Lee, Harper. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York / Boston: Grand Central Printing, 2010. Print.

  27. Jamaal Chin
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    In the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird”, the father of the protagonist is Atticus Finch. Atticus’ parenting style is very different from other parents in Maycomb, Atticus treats his children with respect and sees them as equals. Atticus also does not make the world seem perfect for them but still protects them from some of the more horrible things and people in it.
    Children in the town of Maycomb are generally looked down on and not seen as equal to adults. Atticus has a unique parenting style, where he treats his kids as equals and shows them the same respect that he would show someone his own age, which makes his kids respect him as well. An example of where Atticus sees his children as equals is that he has his kids call him by his first name, this puts his kids and him eye to eye so that they can have a conversation, without speaking down to them. Atticus’ way of speaking to his children gives them a mutual respect with their father, respect that they do not want to lose. “Atticus ain’t ever whipped me since I can remember. I wanta keep it that way.” (Lee 75) When Jem loses his pants at the Radley house, he is afraid that Atticus will be disappointed in him and lose his respect for him. Atticus’ respect for his children gives them a level of maturity and sense of right and wrong that will benefit them as they grow older.
    Atticus knows that his children will encounter a lot of evil in their lives and wants to protect them from it, but he also wants them to be prepared for when they grow older, so that they are not shocked by what they will experience. Atticus wants to protect his children from things, such as the Tom Robinson case because he knows that his kids will not be able to understand the prejudice the mistreatment of Tom. But as the kids learn about the case, Atticus talks with them about it and helps to understand that the racist treatment of Tom is wrong, the society and people who treat him that way are not all evil. Atticus also teaches his children to not listen to the town gossip because it is not always true. Scout and Jem believe that the Radley house is haunted by an evil ghost named Boo because of the gossip they here at school and from miss Stephanie Crawford. “So Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford, a neighborhood scold, who said she knew the whole thing. According to Miss Stephanie, Boo was sitting in the livingroom cutting some items from ‘The Maycomb Tribune’ to paste in his scrapbook. His father entered the room. As Mr. Radley passed by, Boo drove the scissors into his parent’s leg, pulled them out, wiped them on his pants, and resumed his activities.” (Lee 6). Atticus knows that if his children listen to everything the town does his children will not be able to think for themselves, which is why he lets them come to him whenever they need to talk.
    Atticus’ unique parenting style is what keeps his children from falling in line with the views of the rest of Maycomb. Because of this, his children are able to understand right and wrong, something that will help throughout their lives as they grow older.

  28. W.Burtch

    ENG2D1-04

    Ms.D.Cox

    19, April, 2015

    My Opinions on Atticus Finch as a parent

    Being a single parent is a very tough job. You have to care for your kids, be there for them and help them with everything while also managing your own job and life. This is a job that one of our main characters, Atticus does with a unique style. Atticus shows his kids lots of love and compassion while also showing his dominance and authority as a parent. He teaches his kids what’s right and wrong while also showing them the good in people.

    As a parent, it can be believed that you have a certain responsibility to teach your kids right and wrong. Atticus takes a very positive step forward doing just this. Growing up in a very racist society, it would be very common for Scout and Jem to be exposed to persecution and diminishment of fellow black members. It would be easy for an older boy like Jem to join in on this but he hasn’t because of what his father taught him. From the moment we first met Atticus, you could just tell that he was above all of the racism. He believed that everyone was equal and should be treated that way. Whenever his kids asked about the Tom Robinson case, he would deliver to them his true feelings and opinions on the matter and you could tell they believed him. It was remarkable the equality that Scout and Jem believed was there in that courtroom on the day of the trial. This was a quote by Jem that really shows us his belief in Tom’s innocence and how he believed there would be no biases “we’re gonna win Scout. I don’t see how we can’t.” This was after Reverend Sykes told them not to be so confident and Jem fired back with that. This shows us the true belief in what Atticus has taught him and like his father, how he believes in a true equal society.

    The second style of parenting that is unique to Atticus is his underlying focus and determination to show his children that all people have good in them. From the moment this book started, we saw characters who many assumed were bad, like Boo Radley and the newspaper writer. Throughout all of the critics and discriminators that many people faced, you could always see that Atticus was on their side. Whenever his children would try to insult as they would say “catch” Boo, Atticus would always be there to make sure that they respected him and his privacy. A great example of the good that Atticus would see in people is when the Cunningham’s tried to attack Tom at the jail and Jem was there to witness them. When Jem asked Atticus why they were so evil, he simply responds with “Mr. Cunningham’s basically a good man…he just has his blind spots along with the rest of us”. This shows us how Atticus can find the positives in almost any situation and how he would like to teach his kids the same

    As a child it can sometimes be hard to see your parent’s rationale with things and why they do what they do. It happens to all children. For Scout and Jem, they have sometimes not seen this fact but I think most times, they do see the positives in what Atticus is doing for them and how he is just trying to help them. Even though many may call his parenting styles “odd” and possibly unusual, I believe that Atticus is doing a fantastic job as a parent.

    Sent from my iPhone

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